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FAQ

CAN I CONSUME ALCHOL WHILST MEDICATING WITH MEDICINAL CANNABIS?

We do not recommend consuming any alcohol while using medical cannabis.

IS MEDICINAL CANNABIS THE SAME AS BLACK MARKET CANNABIS?

Both medicinal cannabis and black market cannabis come from the same species family, however, there are many differences between the resultant products:

  • Black market cannabis is grown illegally from unknown sources and may contain pesticides, moulds and bacteria which may be harmful.
  • Recreational cannabis has been bred over time to contain high amounts of the psychoactive cannabinoid THC. It is possible that both presence and / or concentration of THC may not be appropriate for your condition.
  • The manufacture of medicinal cannabis is subject to strict regulations and must conform to Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). These standards ensure products are free form harmful ingredients or bi-products.
  • Manufacture and import of legal medicinal cannabis products are checked and tracked by the Australian Government to ensure patients receive legitimate medicine.
  • Black market cannabis is inconsistent. Legal medicinal cannabis is highly regulated and quality controlled to ensure patients receive accurate dosing from one product to the next.
  • Data gathered from the use of legal medicinal cannabis, to treat patients, contributes to the knowledge base of medicinal cannabis and its benefits for various conditions. Black market cannabis does not contribute to this.
HOW DO I LEGALLY CARRY MEDICINAL CANNABIS?

When you are in possession of your medical cannabis, you must carry it in the original packaging with a valid medical document label attached.

This medical document label contains important information, including your unique identification number, the amount of medical cannabis that your physician prescribed and the date of expiry.

CAN I DRIVE WHILE TAKING MEDICINAL CANNABIS?

It is illegal for any patient being treated with medicinal cannabis containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to drive whilst undergoing treatment.

Some medicinal cannabis formulations contain THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). THC is the main psychoactive component of cannabis. Research has shown that THC can impact a person’s ability to drive. Unlike alcohol, there is no specific concentration of THC that authorities can use as an indicator for impairment.

CAN I GROW MY OWN CANNABIS?

You cannot legally produce your own cannabis for medicinal cannabis use.

Home grown cannabis is not subject to the strict cultivation and manufacturing guidelines that licenced medicinal cannabis producers are. Consequently, home grown cannabis can contain unknown concentrations of active ingredients as well as potentially harmful contaminants. In addition, home grown products can be easily diverted to the illicit drug market.

Licenced medicinal cannabis products are consistent, contaminant free and high quality so doctors can make safe prescribing and dosing decisions.

IS HEMP OIL THE SAME AS CBD OIL?

In Australia, Hemp Seed Oil does not contain active concentrations of CBD or THC as these are not found in the seed of the cannabis plant.

Australian Hemp oil is a health product rich in Omega-6 (GLA) and Omega-3 (SDA) essential fatty acids. These fats may help the body metabolise fat, counteract aging, increase immune system strength, lower cholesterol and help prevent cardiovascular disease.

Please note, the regulations and specification around Hemp seed oil and Hemp oil vary between countries. In Australia, medicinal cannabis containing CBD is a Schedule 4 prescription only medication as set out by the TGA. In Australia, medicinal cannabis containing THC is a Schedule 8 Controlled Drug as set out by the TGA.

CAN I PRESCRIBE MEDICINAL CANNABIS?

In Australia, only health practitioners can prescribe medicinal cannabis. A ‘health practitioner’ means a person who, under a law of a State or internal Territory, is registered or licensed to practice in any of the following health professions:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practice;
  • dental (not including the professions of dental therapist, dental hygienist, dental prosthetist or oral health therapist);
  • medical;
  • medical radiation practice;
  • nursing;
  • midwifery;
  • occupational therapy;
  • optometry;
  • pharmacy;
  • physiotherapy;
  • podiatry;
  • psychology

Non-health practitioners Upon registration of an account, non-health practitioners will not be able to draft or submit applications to the TGA. This is in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 (the Act) and associated regulations relevant to the SAS. However, non-health practitioner users will be able to affiliate with a site to view the progress of submissions made to the TGA in their user dashboards.

IS QUALITY OF MEDICINAL CANNABIS ASSURED?

Unapproved medicinal cannabis products imported into and supplied/manufactured in Australia must conform with Therapeutic Goods Order No. 93 (Standard for Medicinal Cannabis) (TGO 93).

TGO 93 is a standard that specifies minimum quality requirements for medicinal cannabis products. It is an offence under the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989, to import, export, or supply therapeutic goods that do not conform to an applicable standard.

CAN PATIENTS OF SCHOOL AGES BE VIABLY TREATED?

If a patient is of school age, they can have their prescribed product administered at school in the same way as other medicines.

It is worth discussing dosage regime with your doctor. Depending on the dosing regimen for the related condition, the medication may not be required to go to school.

WHAT ARE TERPENES?

Secreted in the same glands that produce cannabinoids, like THC and CBD, terpenes are aromatic oils that provide cannabis strains with distinctive aromas like citrus, berry, mint, and pine.

Over 100 different terpenes have been identified in the cannabis plant, and every strain tends toward a unique terpene type and composition. It is thought that some terpenes may play a key role in differentiating the effects of various cannabis strains.

For example, some terpenes may promote relaxation and stress-relief, while others may promote focus and acuity. Linalool, for example, is believed to be relaxing whereas limonene elevates mood. The most fascinating characteristic of terpenes is their ability to interact synergistically with other compounds like cannabinoids. As such, terpenes are thought to be part of the entourage effect. More research is needed to understand each terpene’s effect when used in harmony with other components of the plant. Through the entourage effect, terpenes may offer additional medical value by mediating our body’s interaction with therapeutic cannabinoids. Many cannabis analysis labs now test terpene content. Through this we may begin to understand what effects each strain of cannabis may produce.

For any other enquiries, please contact us.